Is the Construction industry losing its MOJO*?

“Ask anyone from a Grade Sep who’s worked 14+hour days, in tight corridors, with ongoing design issues, in bad weather conditions, about how fast mojo evaporates”

MOJO – Energy, Motivation, Resilience

Everyone who works on projects knows it’s a hard slog. Lots of time, cost, quality AND safety pressures; demanding clients (sometimes); and bosses who (sometimes) don’t understand the meaning of “support”.

At the start, there’s lots of mojo to go around. The team are optimistic about achieving goals; there’s excitement about creating a positive legacy (“Look kids, I built that”); not to mention the potential for career growth. How long this “commencement morale” is maintained depends on the job.

IF there is adequate resourcing, IF the hours are reasonable, IF the client is congenial, it will last longer than for example on a Level Crossing Removal project.

Ask anyone from a Grade Sep who’s worked 14+hour days, in tight corridors, with ongoing design issues, in bad weather conditions, about how fast mojo evaporates.

It’s called END-OF-JOB SYNDROME and on some jobs, it arrives BEFORE the end of the job.

How it looks and feels is like this- what was challenging at the beginning is now just boring repetition; as the team dwindles, the ones who are left lose hope that they will get it all done, on time; and the haunted look is not just a reflection of having sat through too many episodes of Netflix the night before.

Realistically, our normal mojo level may not return to its normal bandwidth until we are off the job (or on holidays-yay), but there are a number of things which will make a difference in the interim.

Last week, Construction Advisor ran a short, punchy seminar (Mojo Up) focused on helping Engineers and Supervisors currently on a major project learn how to get through to the end, feeling better mentally and physically. If you think your project needs this fresh, powerful seminar – get in touch with us at ask@constructionadvisor.com.au

Module 1 – Rejuvenate

Low mojo usually means you do things more slowly than usual, and therefore productivity suffers.

The answer is not to try to rev up, but rather know how to wring out more benefit from the sleep you do get to help you through the day (6 factors that improve sleep which don’t include alcohol).

Also how to turn your mind off so that you give it a break from being “on” 24/7 (4 ways to turn your mind switch to down, down, down without having to go to Coles).

Module 2 – Communicate

Another factor which deflates mojo and increases frustration is the inability to let off steam in a controlled way.

Whingeing to your boss about the workload is unlikely to achieve much except “What the >?* #+”, so instead of bottling everything up and blowing a fuse when someone asks a dumb question (either at work or at home), find a buddy to whinge to.

It’s a form of “talk therapy” and why counselling often works better than medication- it is talking it out that IS the medicine.

Rosemary Tilley,

Director

Construction Advisor